RandomText is a handy WordPress plugin that allows you to save, edit and delete categorized text, and inject random/rotated text by category into the sidebar (via widget) or page body (via template tags).
some random text
A More Human way to learn
RandomText is a handy WordPress plugin that allows you to save, edit and delete categorized text, and inject random/rotated text by category into the sidebar (via widget) or page body (via template tags).
some random text
A More Human way to learn
RandomText is a handy WordPress plugin that allows you to save, edit and delete categorized text, and inject random/rotated text by category into the sidebar (via widget) or page body (via template tags).
some random text
A More Human way to learn
RandomText is a handy WordPress plugin that allows you to save, edit and delete categorized text, and inject random/rotated text by category into the sidebar (via widget) or page body (via template tags).
some random text
A More Human way to learn
RandomText is a handy WordPress plugin that allows you to save, edit and delete categorized text, and inject random/rotated text by category into the sidebar (via widget) or page body (via template tags).

Midori.Earth Database Charter

Introduction

The Midori database is built based on publicly available sources like the FDA. At the core, we believe that consumers, regardless of their geographies, should be made aware of the latest peer-reviewed studies around the world.

The health effects of many chemicals are still unknown due to a lack of research and for that reason we take a conservative approach because when it comes to health we don’t gamble!

What is it?

Midori.Earth automatically scans the ingredient lists of products you browse online so you can gain insight on the health impact that these products might have on you and your loved ones. We are currently supporting the following products and are working hard to expand our list: baby care, cosmetics, cleaning and general personal care products.

How does it work?

While you’re exploring your favorite shopping websites (currently Amazon only), the Midori.Earth browser extension lights up when chemical ingredients of concern are found. The Midori scanner draws its information from our proprietary database built with the help of publicly available, peer-reviewed studies and presents the information in a way that is easy to understand and remember.  

Where do we get our data?

We only use publicly available peer reviewed studies from organizations like: the European Commission, The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (CIR), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Health Canada and the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA). You can check the source for every information we show you. Our fact checkers are looking at these sources on a monthly basis to update the information if regulations change (see Appendix A)

What kind of information will you see?

We have analyzed the risk according to the 5 categories detailed below. Based on how the information is communicated, you will also gain insight as to the relative level of scientific certainty (ex: you will see the distinction between a ‘known human carcinogen’ and a ‘potential carcinogen’). We also note when negative health effects occur at concentrations higher than what you would find in personal care products so you get the full picture.

We separate the different types of alerts in 5 categories:

Carcinogens: This alert will go off if we spot either a known or potential human carcinogen

Developmental effects: This alert will go off if we find an ingredient that can negatively impact the development of babies from the embryo stage to middle childhood.

Reproductive effects: This alert will go off if we find an ingredient that can negatively impact the reproduction system of both women and men.

Neurological effects: This alert will go off if we find an ingredient that can negative impact brain functions

Irritants and Allergens: This alert will go off if we find an ingredient that has been linked to irritation (Skin, eyes, respiratory system) as well as allergic reactions in certain individuals

Limitations

While we are striving to include more individual products and product categories, we are still human and building a comprehensive database can take some time. You may come across the following situations:

Ingredient information not yet available: This means we haven’t yet analyzed the ingredient list of this particular product. Please flag any product that you would like us to include in the database.

Shopping website not supported: This means that we are hard at work to make the Midori.Earth browser extension come to life on this website. We will make announcements on our website every time a new feature is available so stay tuned!

Appendix

North American Sources:

  • The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the National Toxicology Program, Report on Carcinogens, 14th Edition.
  • The California Environmental Protection Agency, Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986 ("Proposition 65").
  • The Government of Canada, ingredients prohibited or restricted in cosmetics (Cosmetic Ingredient Hotlist).
  • The U.S. FDA, Code of Federal Regulations (Title 21, Part 700).
  • The U.S. FDA, Potential contaminants in cosmetics.

European Sources:

  • The European Chemicals Agency (ECHA), http://echa.europa.eu.
  • The European Commission, Substances prohibited or restricted in cosmetic products (CosIng annexes II and III).
  • The European Commission, Preservatives allowed in cosmetic products (CosIng annex V).
  • The European Commission's Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety, fragrance allergens in cosmetic products (2012), and other reports.

Other Sources:

  • The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), IPCP report on endocrine disruptors (2017).
  • ChemSec, the International Chemical Secretariat, SIN List.
Have a question about our charter? Get in touch